Monday, July 25, 2016

Halifax Pride

Saturday was the Pride Parade in Halifax.  The forecast was quite ominous -- rain / thunderstorms -- so we were lucky that there were just a few sprinkles.

Though the parade started at 1 p.m. Wendy and I were positioned near the end of the route with many other folk staring intently at the empty road in anticipation, when at 1:45 something unexpected happened; a volunteer stood in the middle of the street with one finger on her lips and her other hand raised with a finger pointed upward.  It took a few seconds for us to catch on.  Slowly the hubbub died down, and more hands began pointed skyward.  It was amazing as the street became silent.  Not a word.  Not at peep.  Fingers pointing toward the heavens.  We stood united united in silence.


No one needed to tell us why we were standing quietly.  We knew.  And we stood one minute, two minutes, and then a couple of minutes more.  Each of us thinking our own thoughts.



And then we saw a mounted police officer coming and knew the parade had arrived.


There were a number of floats but mostly there were various groups, marching, sashaying, dancing, vamping and parading past us.

There were lawyers, teachers, doctors, and nurses.


There was the R.C.M.P. military representatives and local police.


There were banks, grocery stores, and churches.  I'm not sure about the motivation of the banks and grocery stores.

"Gay by God"

 This couple along with their children were part of the CBC group.



Wouldn't it be lovely if the couple in the image below could fearlessly walk hand-in-hand on the other 364 days of the year  ?  





 Pride parades are not about just supporting our gay brothers and sisters.  There are so many different sexual realities that we need to educate ourselves about and support.


It's more than just rainbow colours.
 
NDP (political party) float.













A few years back the Progressive Conservative Party of  Nova Scotia had a very minimal showing in the parade.  This year they had a much higher profile handing out rainbow coloured cards that read:


RESPECT
Treat all citizens equally, regardless of ability, race, gender, religion, language, First Nations status, marital status and/or sexual orientation.

We are moving forward but we still have a very long way to go.    

This link takes you to a page with helpful definitions of some LGBT+ terms.  For example, are you cisgender ?  Are you an ally ?  

Halifax Pride

Saturday was the Pride Parade in Halifax.  The forecast was quite ominous -- rain / thunderstorms -- so we were lucky that there were just a few sprinkles.

Though the parade started at 1 p.m. Wendy and I were positioned near the end of the route with many other folk staring intently at the empty road in anticipation, when at 1:45 something unexpected happened; a volunteer stood in the middle of the street with one finger on her lips and her other hand raised with a finger pointed upward.  It took a few seconds for us to catch on.  Slowly the hubbub died down, and more hands began pointed skyward.  It was amazing as the street became silent.  Not a word.  Not at peep.  Fingers pointing toward the heavens.  We stood united united in silence.


No one needed to tell us why we were standing quietly.  We knew.  And we stood one minute, two minutes, and then a couple of minutes more.  Each of us thinking our own thoughts.



And then we saw a mounted police officer coming and knew the parade had arrived.


There were a number of floats but mostly there were various groups, marching, sashaying, dancing, vamping and parading past us.

There were lawyers, teacher, doctors, and nurses.


There was the R.C.M.P. and local police.


There were banks, grocery stores, and churches.

"Gay by God"

 This couple along with their children were part of the CBC group.



Wouldn't it be lovely if the couple in the image below could fearlessly walk hand-in-hand on the other 364 days of the year  ?  





 Pride parades are not about just supporting our gay brothers and sisters.  There are so many different sexual realities that we need to educate ourselves about and support.


It's more than just rainbow colours.
 
NDP (political party) float.













A few years back the Progressive Conservative Party of  Nova Scotia had a very minimal showing in the parade.  This year they had a much higher profile handing out rainbow coloured cards that read:


RESPECT
Treat all citizens equally, regardless of ability, race, gender, religion, language, First Nations status, marital status and/or sexual orientation.

We are moving forward but we still have a very long way to go.   An acquaintance the day after the parade asked me "Did you see me at the parade?".  "No I didn't", I replied, "were you there?".   "No" he responded.  "Why would I go to THAT !?" his voice indicating his disapproval.  

As I said.  We still have a  long way to go.

This link takes you to a page with helpful definitions of some LGBT+ terms.  For example, are you cisgender ?  Are you an ally ?  

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Clearly I've become spoiled.

How many places have I explored in Nova Scotia and come away not having my high expectations met ?   I'm used to constantly being delighted and surprised by stunning scenery, so I guess it was inevitable I would finally go some where that let me down.

The days was sunny and hot when I met up with Sara and Kelly in Chester to catch the 10:30 am ferry to Big Tancook Island.  The 50 minute ferry ride cost $7 (return).  Before the boat left we were entertained to watch various pieces of cargo being loaded onto the open back deck.


Once everything was loaded we were allowed onto the upper deck and soon were underway.


I was a tad worried that one of the dogs might be sea sick or anxious about being on a rocking boat but they were marvellous.  I laid my denim jacket down on the deck and asked them to lie down and that's how they spent the trip.


Their good behaviour did not go unnoticed.


Once on the island we were given maps and a brief low down on what's where, and we set off.  We walked up the hill from the wharf,


where we saw this rather baffling sign.

I wanted to ask how much the "Free" bike rentals were.

We chose a direction and set off along the dusty road.  


We stopped to explore a cemetery.


A sad marker for a three-day old child.
"Rest for the little sleeper"
I'm fascinated by the iconography displayed on headstones and how the symbolism has changed through the years.  I haven't been able to find out what the "2 1/2" means.  


I expected to see quaint, brightly painted homes on our walk.  Instead we saw untended fields, front yards laden with rusting abandoned cars and many abandoned homes.  There was a bleak feeling to the walk.



Abandoned cars lined the route.
It would appear even God has left the island ...



The abandoned manse next to the church
Sara taking a photo through the front window.
The walk across the island was under 2 km.  


Our goal was a cove that proved to be crowded, noisy and weed-covered so we continued on the road and found a spot where the dogs could run off-leash and cool off in the ocean.


A fog bank clouded the horizon far out at sea.


The road came to an abrupt end facing this scenic spot.  It was getting late and we had to walk back along the same route to find somewhere to eat before we caught the 4:30 ferry home.  Miss the ferry and you're stuck overnight on the island !


After slogging it back to "town" we sought out photo opportunities while looking for somewhere to eat.

Kelly taking a shot of the most colourful house on the island.  
"I must be a mermaid, I have no fear of depths and a great fear of shallow living"
Wendy and Sooki humour me and pose for yet another picture.
I got snapped taking the above snap
We snagged a stranger to take our photo before we had a very late lunch and caught the 4:30 ferry back to Chester.

Me, Sara and Kelly with a couple of fed up dogs.
All-in-all it was a good outing with friends.  Like I said.  Clearly I've become spoiled.